Publications

  •  Muller, Derek A., et al. “Saying the wrong thing: Improving learning with multimedia by including misconceptions.” Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 24.2 (2008): 144-155.

  • Muller, Derek A., Kester J. Lee, and Manjula D. Sharma. “Coherence or interest: Which is most important in online multimedia learning.” Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 24.2 (2008): 211-221.

  • Muller, Derek A., Manjula D. Sharma, and Peter Reimann. “Raising cognitive load with linear multimedia to promote conceptual change.” Science Education92.2 (2008): 278-296.

  • Muller, Derek A., et al. “Conceptual change through vicarious learning in an authentic physics setting.” Instructional Science 35.6 (2007): 519-533.

  • Mayo, Ashleigh, Manjula D. Sharma, and Derek A. Muller. “Qualitative differences between learning environments using videos in small groups and whole class discussions: A preliminary study in physics.” Research in Science Education 39.4 (2009): 477-493.

  • Muller, Derek Alexander. Designing effective multimedia for physics education. Diss. University of Sydney Australia, 2008.

  • Muller, Derek A. “Inside the quantum mechanics lecture: Changing practices.”Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, Sydney(2005).

  • Muller, Derek A., and Manjula D. Sharma. “Tackling misconceptions in introductory physics using multimedia presentations.” Proceedings of The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education (formerly UniServe Science Conference). 2012.

  • Muller, D., John Eklund, and M. Sharma. “The future of multimedia learning: Essential issues for research.” The Australian Educational Researcher 33.2 (2006): 25-68.

  • Kuan, N., Sharma, M., Lindstrøm, C., & Muller, D. (2012, September). Embedding research principles into multimedia teaching and learning tools. InProceedings of The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education (formerly UniServe Science Conference).

  • Muller, Derek A., and Manjula D. Sharma. “Determining the factors affecting student perceptions of a popular science video.” Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 21.4 (2005): 491.